Master Of My Make-Believe Master Of My Make-Believe

Álbumes

Santigold Santigold Master Of My Make-Believe

6.5 / 10

Things we didn't know about four years ago: Spotify, Lady Gaga, PlayGround, the Llevant Stage at Primavera Sound, “Waka Waka”, Lana Del Rey; that M.I.A could look posh in a Madonna video and that R&B was going to be gobbled up by David Guetta. That was the state of things when Santi White's debut album “Santogold” came out. In the four years she subsequently took to create the follow-up, she modified her stage name (a guaranteed and irritating source of errors for future archivists) and she cut the artistic ties with John Hill: his name is credited on just three songs on the new album.

The start of “Master Of My Make-Believe” couldn't be more promising. The urgency of the beat of “GO!”, co-written by Yeah Yeah Yeahs' Nick Zimmer and produced by Switch, accompanies a declaration of intent that sounds like self-assertiveness rather than a justification: take it easy and you'll remain. “Do you forget my basis / Want to go long, to go long / You must go slow”, she sings. The excitement continues with the single, “Disparate Youth”, a pop gem on which White once more displays the melodic talent she showed on “L.E.S. Artistes” and “Lights Out”.

However, that energy is not be repeated throughout the rest of the album, where Santigold's eclectic personality gets diluted among decent tribal tracks ( “Freak Like Me”), reggae-pop ( “Pirate In The Water”), standard bubble-gum choruses ( “The Keepers”, recorded with the ubiquitous Greg Kurstin) and disappointing displays of fierceness like “Look At These Hoes”: if there's one thing we didn't need to know it's that Santigold can't stand in the shadow of Nicki Minaj in certain registers. The calmer moments are the most memorable ones, when she exercises one of her strongest points: the pop ballad with a twist. “God From The Machine”, “This Isn’t Our Parade” and, particularly, “The Riot’s Gone” are good reasons to trust Santigold will end up finding the place she's claiming on the schizophrenic and broken present pop scene.

¿Te ha gustado este contenido?...

También te gustará

Snapshots of Dangerous Women

Actualidad

La transgresión cotidiana: elogio fotográfico de la mujer inconformista

Mujeres peligrosas por la simple razón de ser atrevidas.

leer más
cocaína

Ficciones

Soy adicta a la peor droga del mundo

Creo que estoy perdiendo el control.

leer más
olas

Historias

Las olas quieren decirnos algo, y este fotógrafo lo sabe

Ray Collins empezó fotografiando a sus amigos surferos, pero en seguida comprendió quiénes eran las protagonistas. 

leer más
top hormigas

Actualidad

¿Ves esta hormiga? Ella también te ve a ti

Después de crear canguros, pingüinos y mariposas robot, la compañía Festo lanza las hormigas biónicas

leer más
Stilyagi

Actualidad

Hipsters soviéticos y gatos voladores: un viaje a la contracultura rusa

"Ha que convencer a la mayoría silenciosa de alzar su voz contra el regreso del totalitarismo"

leer más
Nueva York

Actualidad

La cara más violenta de Nueva York en 10 fotos históricas

Cada esquina de Nueva York huele a sangre fresca, esta ciudad lleva el crimen en su ADN.

leer más
topfb

Historias

El día que Facebook me reveló la noticia más dolorosa de mi vida

No tenía cobertura. Necesitaba Wi-Fi. Pero hubiese preferido no conectarme.

leer más
top hearst 2

Historias

De millonaria a terrorista: la rehén que se enamoró de sus secuestradores

La biografía de Patty Hearst tratará de desvelar por qué se unió a sus secuestradores, pero ella no la leerá.

leer más

cerrar
cerrar