Piques

Do You Want Your Dead Idols To Be Resuscitated As A Hologram?

Tupac’s virtual presence in Coachella opens the gates: will deceased legends come back to offer live shows from the great beyond?

El 53% ha votado Si

El 47% ha votado No

2198 votos Sí: 53% Sí: 47%

Opinión a favor del Si por Mario G. Sinde

We have to admit that music is a show, another form of entertainment, and as such, I want to have the best time possible at a concert. If I went to see New Order and a hologram of Ian Curtis appeared when they played “Love Will Tear Us Apart”, I would totally trip. Or if Los Evangelistas were to bring out Enrique Morente in one of their live shows, I would be moved to tears. As long as they don’t abuse it and it’s a one-time thing, I don’t see anything wrong with it. There are bands like Gorillaz and Battles that deal with the absence of their vocalists (for example, Shaun Ryder and Matías Aguayo, respectively) by having them singing on the visual screen. I’ve never seen anybody complain about that. The hologram thing is just a technological advance that shouldn’t be rejected out of hand conservatively.

Opinión a favor del No por María-Wendoline Castro

The subject under debate here is not whether a hologram as such works to reinforce a stage show, but rather its evil use as a tool for taking money from us and usurping the memory of deceased celebrities from the history of music. Tupac has opened the gates, but I have no doubt at all that this revolution (still to be exploited) will bring us fake tours by Elvis, Michael Jackson, Amy Winehouse and any other precious cadaver that can still draw a crowd. Everything has a limit. If we can’t see one of our favourites because we’re too late, we’re screwed, and that’s all there is to it. I’m not going to spend a penny of my hard-earned money to see one of these holograms.

El 53% ha votado Si

El 47% ha votado No

2198 votos Sí: 53% Sí: 47%

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